Yellow-bellied Glider

Yellow-bellied Glider (Petaurus australis)

Petaurus australis

Identification:

Body length 280 mm; tail length 420 mm; weight 550 g. Black fore and hind paws; naked black ears; claws white. Belly buff-yellow, orange or white, depending on age. Gliding membrane extends from wrist to ankle.

Habitat and Range:

Tall open eucalypt forest (most generally wet forest). Known from Greenbank, Park Ridge and Mt Nebo. Rare. Patchy distribution in coastal areas of eastern Australia (except Tas.).

Notes:

Nocturnal. Noted for its long glides (over 100 m recorded), loud gurgling calls, and habit of slashing tree trunks to obtain exuded gums. Incisions on trunks resemble a human 'kiss' shape. Locally favoured trees (in order of importance) are: Grey Gums (Eucalyptus longirostrata and Eucalyptus biturbinata), Forest Red Gum (Eucalyptus  tereticornis), Gum-topped Box (Eucalyptus mollucana) and Spotted Gum (Corymbia citriodora). Insects, nectar and pollen are also eaten. Similar to the Greater Glider but with naked ears.

Threats:

Land clearing and felling of old hollow nest trees.

Traces:

Weeping incisions on feed trees. Call ooo-cree-cha-cree-cha-chigga-woo-ja. Droppings are like small, rough-skinned avocados, indented on the side of the narrow end (20 mm long by 9 mm at widest end).

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